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GHOST KICKED OUT OF CEMETERY


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PARIS – Authorities took the corpse of a woman out of one cemetery and buried it in another – because her screaming ghost was disturbing neighbors!

Only a few days after Yvonne DeLyon, 61, was buried in the first graveyard, complaints began pouring in from people who live nearby. The public outcry conitnued for six months before officials finally had to take action.

“That woman screamed and wailed all night,” said one resident of the small town of Feurs, France. “It scared us almost to death. The whole reasons my family and I moved here beside the cemetery was because it was quiet and peaceful. But it got so we couldn’t get a decent night’s sleep.”

Accounts from the complaining citizens charge that much of the noise was incoherent ranting. But many of the terrified and outraged townspeople claim they distinctly heard the dead woman nagging and berating her husband, who died three years before her.

One man said he clearly overheard her yelling things like, “Charles, don’t you dare leave that wet towel on the bed,” or “Why don’t we ever go out to dinner?”

Jean Vecque, director and manager of the cemetery, confirms the reports. “I’ve never believed in ghosts,” says the conservative 51 year old. “I’ve been in the business for 19 years and seen hundreds of corpses. But this is the first time I’ve heard one roaring and bellowing from the coffin.”

“At first I thought it was someone playing a practical joke. So I personally investigated it. I stood out by the grave all night. It was enough to scare me to death. I never heard such eerie screeching. And it was definitely coming from the grave.”

One odd sidelight of the case is that Mrs. DeLyon was quiet and retiring when she was alive.

Dr. Yvette Colvert, a noted French parapsychologist who was called in to investigate, says, “This happens occasionally with people who were timid and shy in life. After death, they finally get the courage to stand up for their rights. Then there’s just no stopping them.”

Mrs. DeLyon’s only surviving relative, her son, Jacques DeLyon, tried to fight the town council’s demand to have the body exhumed. “I admit it was disturbing their sleep and frightening their children,” said Mr. DeLyon. “But I paid good money for that plot and she has the right to be laid to rest there.”

But his bid to keep her there was defeated unanimously.

Her body now lies in a rural graveyeard, miles from the town, in the French countryside.